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NCEO Scientists awarded NASA Langley Reid Award

Published in the American Meteorological Society Online: http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/BAMS-D-12-00149.1 the paper "Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit" has been awarded the NASA Langley Reid Award.  Awarded annually, The Reid Award recognizes "the best scientific or technical paper. Once a year the Langley Science Council judges papers submitted for the Award based on judges scores for Importance of the Problem, Significance of the Contribution, Originality of the Concept, and Quality of the Reporting. Papers published in the last several years are eligible to be submitted for consideration."

NCEO's Helen Brindley and Richard Bantges (both from Imperial College London) are co-authors on the paper, which describes:

"The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5–50 ?m), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320–2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit.” CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations."